Gideon Katjimba is a self-taught engineer from Kunene General Company. He displays toys cars with digital features in Windhoek (Namibia) on August 30, 2022. Young street engineers from Opuwo in the Kunene region of north-western Namibia are integrating robotics in hand-made toys cars to create new business opportunities. (Photo by Ndalimpinga Iita/Xinhua)

WINDHOEK (Xinhua), Aug. 30, 2010 — Young street engineers from Opuwo, Kunene region, northwestern Namibia, are integrating robotics in hand-made toys cars to create new business opportunities.

The cars were built by attaching metal sheets to strong wires, then painting them before adding a long wire steering wheel.

“Digital technology has now pushed the production process, from the design stage of the toy cars, exploring how we incorporate features such as sensors, lights, sound, and how we can make them self-driving, among others,”Gideon Katjimba (one of the four engineers at Kunene General Company, KGC) who started making toys cars in 2017 said that he was one of the four self-taught.

“Digital technology presents opportunities to grow informal businesses like ours,”He stated Tuesday that it takes the team between three and 10 hours to construct a car, depending upon its size, make and features.

According to Nguhamuine Muharukua founder of KGC, most rural children in remote regions are not able access quality toys.

“We address this gap by delivering products that entice them and inspire curiosity and hope,” Muharukua said.

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Toy cars have also changed the lives of children without any tertiary or professional training.

“We sell between two and three cars daily, each at an average price of 300 Namibian dollars (U.S. 20.15 dollars),”Katjimba stated.

The venture has also attracted new opportunities to collaborate with academia.

The University of Namibia supports the experiment. Professor Erkki Suen, UNAM’s Head of Future Lab Technology, stated that the project combines self-taught automakers with university students to re-model toy cars.

 

Gideon Katjimba (L), an engineer at Kunene General Company is seen with representatives of the Future Lab Technology at University of Namibia in Windhoek on Aug. 30, 2022. Young street engineers in Opuwo, north-western Namibia, have integrated robotics into hand-made toys to create new business opportunities. (Photo by Ndalimpinga Iita/Xinhua)

(220830) — OPUWO(NAMIBIA), August 30, 2022. (Xinhua). Young men assemble toys cars in a workshop located in Opuwo village, Kunene region of Namibia, on August 30, 2022. To capture new business opportunities, young street engineers from Opuwo, Kunene region in north-western Namibia are integrating robotics into handcrafted toy cars. (Xinhua)

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